Helping Business Succeed

Cold calling

Cold calling – changing your perspective changes cold calling

When we look at what actually happens – and can happen – during the cold call, we see why the cold call stage of the selling process is so potent and full of opportunity for the sales person.

When we stop looking at cold calling from the sales person’s viewpoint and from the customer’s viewpoint, and start seeing it from a business perspective, cold calling becomes a wonderful opportunity that any one can enjoy and optimise. Here is my take on cold calling from three different perspectives.

 

how sales people typically see cold calling how customers see cold calling done poorly what successful cold calling should be
fearful

boring, repetitive

unpleasant

pressurised

unimaginative

rejections

thankless

confrontational

unproductive

demoralising

unhappy

numbers game

nuisance

unwanted

indiscriminate, unprepared

pressurising

tricky, shifty

dishonest

reject, repel cold callers

shady, evasive

contrived

insulting

patronising

disrespectful

honest/open

straightforward

interesting/helpful

different/innovative

thoughtful/reasoned

prepared/informed

professional/business-like

efficient/structured

respectful

enthusiastic/up-beat

informative/new

thought-provoking

time/cost-saving

opportunity/advantage

credible/reliable

demonstrable/referenced

 

Top salespeople believe in their companies, their products and their services. Above all they must believe in themselves and in their ability to succeed. Put your heart into your sales work – the planning, the presentation and the follow ups. It all begins with want. Knowing what you want will power the drive.

Successful sellers understand how clients make decisions, and guide the decision-maker through the process to a decision that best meets the clients needs.

  1. PLAN the “sales process” to gather facts, analyse the situation, identify client needs, and build credibility;
  2. OPEN each client interaction by explaining how the client may benefit from participating in the conversation.
  3. IDENTIFY CLIENT BUSINESS ISSUES AND NEEDS in order to fully understand the client’s business environment, issues, needs, and priorities. This allows you to “walk in the client’s shoes.”
  4. RELATE SOLUTIONS TO CLIENT NEEDS by explaining what your or our firm offers and how we add value by helping clients meet their needs and goals.
  5. OBTAIN AND HANDLE FEEDBACK in order to fully understand the client’s reactions to your recommendations or proposals, and to address any concerns the client may have.
  6. GAIN COMMITMENT to your recommendations, and mutually agree on next steps. (Then follow through!)